Back To The Futures: CNBC's New Web Show Goes Live Today

Sean Silva  Follow

The 2008 financial meltdown caused most investors to become extremely conservative with their investment strategies.  Many turned their assets into cash and earned that tantalizing .04% interest rate. Some investors even went as far as to purchase bonds with negative yields!  That’s right, rather than earning interest, they were paying sovereign governments interest just to hold their money safely.

Despite the economic uncertainty that still surrounds us, investors are gravitating back to normal investor behavior. And if CNBC’s new online web-show focused on futures trading is any indication, it seems as we’ve finally made it Back to the Futures.

CNBC is premiering a 15-minute online show today about the multi-trillion dollar futures market called Futures Now.  The show will stream live on CNBC.com on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 P.M.  Its purpose is both informational and educational.

Led by CNBC reporter Jackie DeAngelis, the show will play host to notable futures traders such as Anthony Grisanti of GRZ Energy Inc. and Rich Ilczyszyn of iiTrader. These traders will provide insight on the futures market, much like CNBC’s television network provides insight on capital markets. Viewers with no futures experience can access online tutorials from insiders on the fundamentals of futures trading.

Yet there’s a much bigger picture forming here than just 30 minutes of weekly futures advice. This is a turning point in anticipation of the JOBS Act’s new regulations on advertising and marketing for alternative investments funds. It’s the first stab of a major network shining light on an industry that will not be in the dark for much longer. And it’s another step in the direction of alternative investment funds starting to become more accountable for their actions.

I presume that CNBC is running Futures Now as a test-program, considering its short air-time. But as interest mounts (and it certainly will), and regulations for alternative investment funds become more defined, there is a very good chance that a show like this will make it into CNBC’s television lineup.

So give Ms. DeAngelis and Futures Now a shot this week and see what you think (tune in here). This could be the start of a new era in the financial media industry.

Will you be watching this new show? What does a show like this mean for the alternative investment industry? Will more attention benefit the futures market? Share in the comments. End of Story

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