Why Ambition Has the Potential to"Make or Break You"

Bea Broderick  Follow

Successful and Ambitious Definitions

Read this:  

“Morton is just the ambitious type, and I admire him for it.” (Very nice)

“Morton is just the ambitious type, and he cut me down to get to the top.” (Ouch)

“Morton is just the successful type, and I admire him for it.” (Yippee)

“Morton is just the successful type, and he cut me down to get to the top.” (Huh?)

Now read this:

Success is a relative quality that can be determined by setting your own goals, and then working to achieve them. Oh, and it’s almost always associated with a positive context. Case in point, it simply doesn’t make sense to say, “Morton is just the successful type, and he cut me down to get to the top.” Right?

On the flip side, ambition can easily be fashioned in both a positive or negative way. It’s easy for someone to be ambitious in an attempt to achieve success, but also forget about what it means to be ethical (and considerate) while doing it.  After all, wouldn’t working for a guy like Morton who “did whatever it took” to get to the top be miserable? Yes it would. In fact there are many studies that defend this point by saying that 1) happy people do good work 2) it’s easier to get things done when people like you.

Okay, now ask yourself this:

1) What’s my definition of success—money, fame, honors, a pony?

2)What goals will I have to set for myself in order to be successful?

3)In my attempt to be ambitious, what am I willing to do in order to get the desired result?

Lastly, remember this:

At CJP our success as a company stems from the internal culture that we instill... that each individual success is a win for the whole.  In my time with the company, I’ve seen a few of my colleagues act selflessly for the greater-good of their co-workers and clients. These actions have been constant positive reminders that success presents itself in many different ways. CJP

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